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SLELO PRISM

About the Cover: 2022 Autumn Newsletter

SLELO PRISM has implemented a biological control program that may offer long-term suppression of target invasive species. By introducing approved biocontrols (a.k.a. native predators) we can lessen the labor and cost of other management techniques. This enhances our goal of managing lands and forests for resiliency by reducing the impacts of invasive species.


First HWA Biocontrol Release in SLELO PRISM

Through a collaboration with our partners, HWA biocontrol-Laricobius nigrinus, have been released for the first time in the SLELO region.


Protect Waters From Aquatic Invasive Species

Clean, drain and dry your watercraft to protect your waters from aquatic invasive species.


Beetles and Silverflies Can Save Forests

Hope for the hemlocks may come in the form of a predatory beetle, Laricobius nigrinus, and two silver fly species, Leucotaraxis argenticollis, and Leucotaraxis piniperda.


Protector’s Activity: Don’t Move Firewood

October is one of the most beautiful times of year to get outside in New York and a very popular time to go camping! Learn how you can help stop the spread of invasive insects just by sourcing local firewood for your next camping trip.


Protector’s Activity: Monitor for Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted lanternfly lay their eggs in the fall. Keep an eye out for adults until cold weather and for egg masses now through the winter. Learn what to look for and what to do if you find SLF in this Protector’s blog.


Protector’s Activity: Help Track Beech Leaf Disease

Beech leaf disease (BLD) is the newest threat to beech trees and is spreading rapidly across the Northeastern United States and Canada. You can help by learning to recongize and report BLD.


Garden Protector’s Activity: Supporting Pollinators

Specialized relationships exist between plants, animals, pollinators, and other insects. Invasive species threaten native plants and wildlife by altering the natural habitats on which native species depend.


Removing Water Chestnut From the Oswegatchie River

SLELO partners, stakeholders and volunteers have joined forces to control a large water chestnut infestation on the Oswegatchie River.


Newsletter Cover Story: Summer 2022

Small-scale projects that restore critical corridors can have profound impacts on ecological integrity and resilience in connected landscapes. Learn how work being done along the dunes restores health along the 17-mile dunes coastal barrier.