Current Projects

Survey Says: Invasive Species Affect Peoples well-being and Livelihoods in Northern New York.

Survey Says: Invasive Species Affect Peoples well-being and Livelihoods Here in Northern New York

Often overlooked in our quest to manage invasive species is the impact invasive species have not only to our ecosystems, but to people, our well-being and our livelihoods. Our recent people survey is a real eye-opener suggesting that invasive species in our region do have a genuine and very real impact on peoples well-being and livelihoods. Stay tuned for the survey results! Read More about “Survey Says: Invasive Species Affect Peoples well-being and Livelihoods Here in Northern New York”

Protecting Our Forests

Protecting Our Forests

Volunteers and partners of the SLELO PRISM learn to protect our forests and neighborhoods from forest pests by adopting-a-trap. Community preparedness and protecting our forests begins with an understanding of the threats posed by invasive pests and pathogens that impact healthy trees. Tracking the spread of such pests helps us to be more prepared for their arrival. Read More about “Protecting Our Forests”

Environmental DNA

Environmental DNA Reference Guide Available

eDNA Citizen Science Reference Guide now available. In the Eastern Lake Ontario Region the SLELO PRISM partners in cooperation with The Nature Conservancy, the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Cornell University and NYS Department of Environmental Conservation have implemented a project to assess the feasibility of using environmental DNA or eDNA as an early detection tool for aquatic invasive species. Over 400 water samples will be collected from four strategic locations along Eastern Lake Ontario and analyzed using highly specialized processes known as qPCR for the presence of genetic material release by both invasive and native aquatic animals. The newly published Citizen Science Reference Guide is now available on this website under the Resources/Download menu option. Read More about “Environmental DNA Reference Guide Available”

Restoring The Salmon River

Restoring The Salmon River

After completing a feasibility study, partners of the SLELO PRISM endorsed an initiative to restore portions of the Salmon River by 1) Suppressing Japanese Knotweed populations, 2) Restoring treated sites by planting native seed and plants and 3) implementing a robust educational & outreach component. After four years of effort the project has been deemed a success. Read More about “Restoring The Salmon River”

Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention

Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention

2016 marks the first season of an intense effort to reduce the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS). Through a $100k grant from the NYS DEC Invasive Species Spread Prevention Grants Program (NYS Environmental Protection Fund) four AIS stewardship specialists were strategically placed at high use/high priority boat launches along Eastern Lake Ontario and the data collected tells a real story. Read More about “Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention”

Water Chestnut Biological Control

Rusty Crayfish Detected in SLELO Region

Early detection surveillance in SLELO PRISM Priority Conservation Areas (PCA’s) confirmed Rusty Crayfish in two waterbodies. Adult males and females were discovered in Oneida Lake, leading us to believe that they have been in Oneida Lake for some time. Another discovery occurred in Delta Lake Reservoir. Only juveniles were found in Delta Lake Reservoir. The observations were made by Team Members Bryna Daykin and Alicia Wood. Read More about “Rusty Crayfish Detected in SLELO Region”

SLELO News & Events

Great Year for Early Detection & Rapid Response

Thirteen of our twenty-five Priority Conservation Areas (PCA's) were surveyed for prevention or watch list species during the 2017 field season. Thanks to our Early Detection Team Bryna Daykin and Alicia Wood. Surveillance included a close look at hundreds of Highly Probable Areas or (HPA's). Duly noted are two detections of Rusty Crayfish in Oneida and Delta Lakes. Partner observations included trap finds of Emerald Ash Borer in St. Lawrence County. Our Rapid Response/Control Team Mike Parks and Ed Miller successfully treated 16 PCA's for giant hogweed, swallowort, Phragmites and Japanese knotweed totaling some 123 acres of invasive species management. Nice work team!

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Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Don’t look now, but the sky is falling. Again. This time it’s poised ominously over our hemlock trees, whose verdant canopies shade many a North Country stream and glen. Although hemlocks make lush hedges for home landscapes, they’re best known as stately forest giants that form cathedral-like stands in the Adirondacks and elsewhere. It’s hard to believe these titans are being killed by a tiny insect less than a sixteenth of an inch long.

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