Current Projects

Restoring The Salmon River

Restoring The Salmon River

After completing a feasibility study, partners of the SLELO PRISM endorsed an initiative to restore portions of the Salmon River by 1) Suppressing Japanese Knotweed populations, 2) Restoring treated sites by planting native seed and plants and 3) implementing a robust educational & outreach component. After four years of effort the project has been deemed a success. Read More about “Restoring The Salmon River”

Underwater Video Reveals Native Fish

Environmental DNA

Environmental DNA

In the Eastern Lake Ontario Region the SLELO PRISM partners in cooperation with The Nature Conservancy and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Cornell University are implementing a project to assess the feasibility of using environmental DNA or eDNA as an early detection tool for aquatic invasive species. Over 400 water samples will be collected from four strategic locations along Eastern Lake Ontario and analyzed using highly specialized processes known as qPCR for the presence of genetic material release by both invasive and native aquatic animals Read More about “Environmental DNA”

Protecting our Lands and Waters

Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention

Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention

2016 marks the first season of an intense effort to reduce the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS). Through a $100k grant from the NYS DEC Invasive Species Spread Prevention Grants Program (NYS Environmental Protection Fund) four AIS stewardship specialists were strategically placed at high use/high priority boat launches along Eastern Lake Ontario and the data collected tells a real story. Read More about “Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention”

Water Chestnut Biological Control

Water Chestnut Biological Control

In 2014 partners of the SLELO PRISM submitted a request to the New York State Invasive Species Coordination Unit and the NYS Invasive Species Council to prioritize research on the biocontrol of water chestnut (Trapa natans). This request was approved and to date the research has made great advances with the arrival of several hundred potential biocontrol agents, Galerucella birmanica, at Cornell University from the Wuhan region of China. Read More about “Water Chestnut Biological Control”

SLELO News & Events

Hemlock Wooly Adelgid

Don’t look now, but the sky is falling. Again. This time it’s poised ominously over our hemlock trees, whose verdant canopies shade many a North Country stream and glen. Although hemlocks make lush hedges for home landscapes, they’re best known as stately forest giants that form cathedral-like stands in the Adirondacks and elsewhere. It’s hard to believe these titans are being killed by a tiny insect less than a sixteenth of an inch long.

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Land Disturbance & Terrestrial Invasive Species

Often overlooked in our discussions of invasive species pathways and mitigation is the idea of land clearing and infrastructure development, even on a small scale, and the translocation of topsoil contaminated with invasive plant fragments and/or seeds. I assume that the aforementioned “spoil” was used elsewhere to fill a need.

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