SLELO PRISM

Social Media Toolbox

The graphics on this page can be used to enhance invasive species awareness on social media and on websites. 

Please tag @sleloprisminvasives when you use the graphics provided on this page.  

The graphics below showcase the various badges that can be earned by taking a Pledge to Protect your forests, waters, gardens, communities, lands & trails. 

Steps to Download an Image From Photo The Carousel

  1. Click the arrow to move the carousel
  2. Hover over the desired image
  3. Right-click on your mouse 
  4. Select SAVE IMAGE AS

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I took the Pledge to Protect my waters from the threats of invasive species. You can too by visiting iPledgeToProtect.org! #PledgeToProtect 

I took the Pledge to Protect my lands & trails from the threats of invasive species. You can too by visiting iPledgeToProtect.org! #PledgeToProtect 

I took the Pledge to Protect my community from the threats of invasive species. You can too by visiting iPledgeToProtect.org! #PledgeToProtect 

I took the Pledge to Protect my forests from the threats of invasive species. You can too by visiting iPledgeToProtect.org! #PledgeToProtect 

I took the Pledge to Protect my garden from the threats of invasive species. You can too by visiting iPledgeToProtect.org! #PledgeToProtect 

I took the Pledge to Protect my lands and waters from the threats of invasive species. You can too by visiting iPledgeToProtect.org! #PledgeToProtect 

General Invasive Species Social Media Graphics

Please tag @sleloprisminvasives when you use the graphics provided on this page.  

Spotted Lanternfly

This infographic was provided by the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County. Designed by, Jennifer Lerner. 

Spotted Lanternfly

This infographic was provided by the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County. Designed by, Jennifer Lerner. 

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Spotted lanternfly is an invasive plant hopper that threatens our grape, hopp, apple, and maple production. It lays its eggs on nearly anything and can hitchhike on firewood, so #DontMoveFirewood, instead, buy wood where you plan to burn it.

If you spot spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies #DontMoveFirewood

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Spotted lanternfly adults lay eggs in the fall and early winter. Keep an eye out for the brightly colored winged adults and for their grayish/brown waxy egg masses while you enjoy the season.  

If you spott spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

Spotted Lanternfly

This infographic was provided by the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County. Designed by, Jennifer Lerner. 

Spotted Lanternfly

This infographic was provided by the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County. Designed by, Jennifer Lerner. 

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Tree of heaven is a perfered host of invasive spotted lanternfly. To help identify Tree of heaven look for a bump at the base of each leaflet. Another sign you have found tree of heaven is if the leaves give off a foul odor when crushed.  If you spot tree of heaven, check for signs of invasive Spotted lanternfly.

If you spott spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

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Spotted lanternfly lays its eggs on nearly everything. Look for gray to brown colored waxy patches on tree trunks, rocks and other surfaces.

If you spott spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted Lanternfly

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Tree of heaven is an invasive tree that have pinnately compound leaves. Each leaf has 10-41 leaflets with a glandular bump at the base. The leaves give off a foul smell when crushed, and the bark looks similar to the outter peel of cantaloupe fruit. If you spot tree of heaven, check for signs of invasive Spotted lanternfly.

If you spott spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

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Spotted lanternflys lay eggs on nearly everything. Be sure to check your wheel wells, behind vehicle grills, boats and outdoor equipment before traveling. Look for gray to brown colored waxy patches.

If you spot spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted Lanternfly

This infographic was provided by the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County. Designed by, Jennifer Lerner. 

Possible Captions

Keep an eye out for spotted lanternfly egg masses. Check tree bark, rocks, vehicles, outdoor equipment, and nearly any flat surface for inch-long brown colored rowed egg masses that may be underneath a gray waxy covering.

Report findings to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov and get involved in a state-wide survey effort by visiting www.nyimapinvasives.org/slf .

@nyagandmarkets @nyimapinvasives

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Look for signs of Spotted lanternfly.  Keep an eye out for insects that change from black to red to brightly colored winged adults. Egg masses that are covered in a gray-waxy secretion, black sooty mold buildup around plants, or sap oozing from tree trunks. 

If you spot spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

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Spotted lanternfly eggs can easily go unnoticed and can be found on many surfaces. Eggs are about 1-inch long and have a brown, seed-like appearance. They are covered in a mud-like gray-colored secretion that helps them stay glued to a surface in a mass. Eggs are laid in the fall and overwinter. 

If you spot spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted Lanternfly

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Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) is in New York State. SLF eggs can survive over winter. Check tree bark and any flat surface for grayish-brown colored egg masses.

SLF eggs can unknowingly be transported by people; be sure to check vehicles and any equipment & supplies such as boats, trailers, firewood, stone, and outdoor furniture before traveling.

Report sightings of SLF to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov be sure to include photos and note the location.

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

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Spotted lanternfly has been confirmed in Staten Island, Port Jervis, Sloatsburg, Orangeburg and Ithaca New York. This invasive insect can devastate New York’s agricultural and tourism industry and threatens our forests. 

If you spot spotted lanternfly report it to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies 

Oriental Bittersweet Vs. Native Bittersweet

Invasive Buckthorns

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Oriental bittersweet is an invasive woody vine that strangles trees and smothers vegetaion. The best time to distinguish invasive Oriental bittersweet from the native American bittersweet is in the fall when the plants bear fruit. If you see red fruit with eyllow capsules growing at the vine stem, you are seeing the invasive Oriental bittersweet. If you see red berries that have orange capsules that grow at the tips of the vine, you are seeing native American bittersweet.   If you find invasive Oriental bittersweet, take a photo, note your location and report it to iMapinvasives.org

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies

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Autumn is a good time of year to cut and treat invasive buckthorns. The plant draws sap to its roots to store energy for the winter during this time so herbicide treatments will go straight to the roots killing the plant. Plus buckthorns can be easily identified during the fall because it’s leaves remain green after most other plant leaves have turned color or fallen off. After cutting buckthorn, you must either treat or bag the stump to keep it from re-sprouting.

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies

Porcelain Berry

Porcelain Berry & Oriental Bittersweet

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Porcelain berry is an invasvie woody vine that shades out understory vegetation and girdles trees. Being in the grape family, leaves of porcelain berry look very similar to native grape leaves. The best way to distinguish between the two, is to look for purplish-blue colored berries with a porcelain shine to them in the fall. Also if you break the woody stalks of the vine and see a white center or pith, it is porcelain berry.  If you find porcelain berry take a photo, note your location, and report it to megan.pistolese@tnc.org, or to iMapinvasives.org. 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies

Porcelain berry has has been detected in St. Lawrence County in Potsdam and Ogdensburg. The fruit of this invasive plant is easily spread by birds. Porcelain berry has leaves similar to grape leaves but produce purple-blue colored berries with a porcelain shine to them in the fall. If you find porcelain berry report take a photo, note your location and report it to iMapinvasives.org. 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies

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Porcelain berry and Oriental bittersweet are two invasive plants that are easily recognizable by their unique fruit which begin to grow in the fall.  

If you find porcelain berry or Oriental bittersweet, take a photo, note your location and report it to  iMapinvasives.org. 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies

Fall is a good time of year to spot invasive plants. This is especially true for invasive plants like porcelain berry and Oriental bittersweet that grow unique berries that distinguish them from native varieties in the fall. Porcelain berry has purplish-blue colored berries that have a porcelain-like shine to them, while Oriental bittersweet has red berries enclosed with yellow capsules. If you notice plants with these berries please report the observation via NY iMapInvasives

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

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Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is an invasive forest pest that kills hemlock trees. During the fall and winter, HWA forms white woolly masses that can be found along the branches of infested hemlock trees.  Other signs of a HWA include needle loss and needles that have a gray colored cast. Lack of bright green foliage at the tips of branchesin the spring is an indicator that the tree is in distress and is worth taking a closer look for the presence of HWA. 

Learn to ID HWA and Hemlock Trees 

 Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies

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During the fall and winter, HWA forms white woolly masses that can be found along the branches of infested hemlock trees. 

If you see white masses on the branches of hemlock trees, where the needle connects to the branch do the following: 

  • Note your location
  • Take photos of the masses and of the tree
  • Report the observation to the DEC Forest Pest Hotline 1-866-640-0652
  • Report the observation to iMapInvasives.org 

Include @sleloprisminvasives and #invasivespecies

Stay tuned for more infographics. Thanks for sharing! 

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PREVENTION
Prevent the introduction of invasive species into the SLELO PRISM.

EARLY DETECTION & RAPID RESPONSE
Rapidly detect new and recent invaders and eliminate all individuals within a specific area.

COOPERATION
Share resources, including funding personnel, equipment, information, and expertise.

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
Collect, utilize, and share information regarding surveys, infestations, control methods, monitoring, and research.

CONTROL
Control invasive species infestations by using best management practices, methods and techniques to include: ERADICATION (which is to eliminate all individuals and the seed bank from an area), CONTAINMENT (which is reducing the spread of established infestations from entering an uninfested area) and SUPPRESSION which is to reduce the density but not necessarily the total infested area.

RESTORATION
Develop and implement effective restoration methods for areas that have been degraded by invasive species and where suppression or control has taken place.

EDUCATION & OUTREACH
Increase public awareness and understanding of invasive species.

INNOVATION
Develop and implement innovative technologies that help us to better understand, visualize, alleviate or manage invasive species and their impacts or that serve to strengthen ecosystem function and/or processes.

Rob Williams
PRISM Coordinator

Megan Pistolese
Outreach and Education

Brittney Rogers
Aquatic Invasive Species

Robert Smith
Terrestrial Invasive Species

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