Salmon River Restoration Results

In 2013, after completing a feasibility study, partners of the SLELO PRISM endorsed an initiative to restore portions of the Salmon River by 1) suppressing Japanese knotweed populations, 2) restoring treated sites by planting native seed and plants and 3) implementing a robust educational & outreach component. This three year commitment was completed in 2015 with the following results:Tree

Project Success:

Based on the original project goal which was to suppress knotweed populations and given an estimated 35% regrowth of knotweed after three consecutive treatments at some locations, it is reasonable to conclude that we achieved a 65% suppression rate.

Site restoration ranges from moderate to good. Two monitored sites DOT-1 and DSR-2 show little or no knotweed regrowth and very good native plant and grass growth. This same observation is noticed at additional sites treated along the river. Site DSR-1 shows good suppression, but some knotweed regrowth.

In general, the Salmon River corridor appears much different than it did three years ago. As you walk sections of the river banks there is noticeably much less knotweed and people, especially the angling community seem to have greater awareness of Japanese knotweed.

Suppression Results and Field Observations:

  • 8.68 total acres of knotweed treated a minimum of three times over a three year period.
  • Moderate to excellent suppression at most sites.
  • Eradication at only a few sites (no regrowth during the third year).
  • Plant mortality at predominately shade sites was noticeably greater than at sunny sites.
  • Stem injection delivery resulted in a more rapid “initial” die-off, but long term there were no observed differences in mortality between injected sites and foliar treated sites.
  • Soil type played no role as there was no observed difference in mortality between sites with rock soils verses silty-loam soils.

Site Restoration Results and Field Observations:

  • 51,500 sq. feet restored to native grass using annual ryegrass, perennial ryegrass and little bluestem mix at 21 locations.
  • 20% live stake survival using native on-site plant materials.
  • Tree seedling planting being pursued as supplemental restoration (above photo (Pinus strobus seedling).
  • Site restoration ranges from moderate to good. Two monitored sites DOT-1 and DSR-2 show little or no knotweed regrowth and very good native plant and grass growth. This same observation is noticed at additional sites treated along the river. Site DSR-1 shows good suppression, but some knotweed regrowth.
  • First native plants to volunteer at upstream sites included; jewelweed, smartweed, ferns, grass and maple tree seedlings.

Education & Outreach:

  • Presentations to key stakeholders including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, the SLELO PRISM Partnership and representatives of the Salmon River Fish Hatchery.
  • Four hundred informational pamphlets were disseminated at multiple distribution points to include: tackle shops, fish cleaning stations, stores, overnight accommodations and at the main entry gate at the Douglaston Salmon Run property.
  • Informational flyers targeting conservationists and anglers were posted at all DEC kiosks at fishing access sites along the river with permission from DEC.
  • River steward efforts (person-to-person dialog) along the river reached out to a total of 65 anglers.

Acknowledgements:
On behalf of the SLELO partnership, we would like to thank the numerous landowners who gave us permission to access their property along the river for without their permission, this project would have never taken place. We also wish to thank the NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation, The NYS Environmental Protection Fund, The Salmon River Fish Hatchery, Millers Turf Inc., Niagara Mohawk, National Grid and the Village of Pulaski for their cooperation. Thank you to The Nature Conservancy staff whom supported many aspects of this project; including grant administration, field operations, data management & analysis, human resources and especially our seasonal employees who set afoot day in and day out.

To view a detailed Project Report visit our resources page on the top menu bar, path: resources – information sharing – download/reports.

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